Friday, May 02, 2014

May 31: 2014 WISCONSIN STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS (QUICK AND BLITZ)

Fitchburg Community Center, 5520 Lacy Road, Fitchburg WI -- QUICK CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP is held in two sections: Open (adults and juniors) and Scholastic (K-12 only). Time control is 25 minutes (+3 second delay) per player, everyone plays 4 games. Notation is not required. On-site registration begins at 9:00am. Round times: 10am, 11am, 12:45pm, 2pm. Prizes Open: $900 (b/60 or proportional): 1st $250, 2nd $150, class prizes (5-8 players per class): $500 Prizes Scholastic: team trophies to top five schools and 20 individual trophies based on age. Entry Fee: Open $25, Scholastic $20 if enter by May 28th ($5 more afterwards). BLITZ CHAMPIONSHIP is held in one section that is open to everyone. Time control is 3 minutes (+2 second increment) per player, everyone plays 10 games. Round One begins at 3:30pm. Prizes: $900 (b/60 or proportional) and 5 trophies: 1st $250, 2nd $150, class prizes (5-8 players per class): $500. Entry Fee: $25 if enter by May 28th ($5 more afterwards). Online Entry (closes on 5/28 at midnight; convenience fee applies): www.wichessacademy.com. Mailed Entry: Fitchburg Recreation Department, Attention: Chad Sigl/Chess, 5520 Lacy Road, Fitchburg WI 53711. Questions: 608-270-4286 (Chad Sigl) or abetaneli@hotmail.com (Alex Betaneli) ***ALL INDIVIDUAL AND TEAM WINNERS ARE OFFICIAL STATE CHAMPIONS**

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

So it's two tournaments on the same day? Can I just show up for blitz? Will increment clocks be provided?

Alex said...

1. Yes, Quick chess begins in the morning and Blitz starts in the afternoon.
2. Yes, you can choose to play in one event.
3. Yes, clocks that support increment will be provided if neither opponent has one.
We hope to make this the strongest Quick and Blitz State Championships yet!
Alex

Anonymous said...

Any strong players registered?

Anonymous said...

Are either of these events USCF (Quick/Blitz) rated?

Alex Betaneli said...

No. The idea is that people whose membership has expired can participate. Also, to encourage the new comers.

Alex Betaneli said...

Erik Santarius and Tommy Ulrich plan to participate.

David Lawrence said...

Chess is a strange game. Almost everyone that plays it aspires to be stronger, but really, what is the appeal of being stronger. It's not like you are going to get anything at the end of it. Unless you dedicate your life to the game and have considerable talent you'll never get far in the game. The rest of 'em are struggling to get by, inching up the ratings, teaching kids, and giving simuls to pay the rent. To dedicate so much time to what is, let's face it, just a game, always seems slightly sad and futile. I have been obsessed with the game, too, so I can totally empathize. I remember reading a GM's comment that he sometimes thought the weaker players enjoy the game more than stronger players; they have the least invested in it and so can have more fun and spontanaity at the board - for them it is still just a game. If you love chess you should show up for that reason and not because an international master might show up. A chess master is just a person like the rest of us - he happened to spend a lot of time playing and studying chess when you were probably doing something more useful in the big scheme of things.

Anonymous said...

I totally reject this negative attitude about chess. The same things could be said about the study of any field, discipline, sport, or any activity. Whether a person studies/practices the violin, basketball, biology, or literature involves alot of dedication and persistence to be the best. Talent and luck help as well. But why aspire to be mediocre? Aspire to be the best at whatever you do, otherwise I think you should do something else.

Anonymous said...

I reject the idea that playing violin and studying biology are reasonable analogs for the game of chess. Neither is inherently competitive. Basketball is at least in the same ballpark but you scarcely encounter a basketball player who gets depressed for days over making a mistake and losing a game. My point was not to be negative about chess, but to question the fairly common obsession with rating points amongst competitive chess players. As long as you are enjoying yourself and can find appropriate opponents, your rating does not matter at all. Chess skill and chess enjoyment are mostly orthogonal. Having a higher rating does not make you have more fun (in fact stronger often means more seriousness and less fun), nor does it make you a better person, but that is the attitude of some, who look down their noses at the so-called patzers. We would all do well to remember that chess is a game and not to be too upset when we lose - your rating points have no real value outside of ego and matching you fairly with suitable opponents.

Anonymous said...

When you really start to play violin seriously, you will look for any chance for recital. Any you will look at some local competitions. You’ll compare your skills with others, and even people playing same pieces at youtube. You will eventually plan violin competitively.

Any scholar in biology, or other sciences, is living in a competitive world. You will compete with others for limited grants. You will compete with others to publish papers in scientific journals with better SCI rating. You will start to care if your papers will get cited by other peers.
Everything can be competitive. There is even a competition to eat hot dog. Maybe someday, we should organize a competition to eat deep fried butter.

Alex Betaneli said...

2014 WI Quick Chess State Champion: Tommy Ulrich
2014 WI Blitz State Champion:
Erik Santarius
2014 WI Quick Chess Junior State Champion:
Daniel Perelman

More results forthcoming.